Pharmacy Technician

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Pharmacy technicians help licensed pharmacists dispense prescription medication. They work in retail pharmacies and hospitals.

Pharmacy technicians typically do the following:

  • Take from customers or health professionals the information needed to fill a prescription
  • Count tablets and measure amounts of other medication for prescriptions
  • Compound or mix medications, such as preparing ointments
  • Package and label prescriptions
  • Accept payment for prescriptions and process insurance claims
  • Do routine pharmacy tasks, such as answering phone calls from customers

Pharmacy technicians work under the supervision of pharmacists, who must review all prescriptions before they are given to patients. If a customer’s question is about the medication or health matters, the pharmacy technician arranges for the customer to speak with the pharmacist.

Pharmacy technicians working in hospitals and other medical facilities prepare a greater variety of medications, such as intravenous medications. They may make rounds in the hospital, giving medications to patients.

Career Outlook: 
Career Outlook data is specific to New Hampshire State.
Number of Jobs 2010: 
1,411
Number of Projected Jobs 2020: 
1,652
Jobs Percentage Change: 
17.1%
Total Annual Openings: 
48
Growth Outlook: 
Very Favorable
June 2013 Entry Level Wage: 
$10.46
June 2013 Mean Wage: 
$13.87
June 2013 Experienced Wage: 
$15.57
Salary Range: 
$20,000 - $40,000
Education Requirements: 
Programs: 

Education Levels:

This job requires a minimum of a GED or a High School Diploma and on-the-job training. Please consult your Case Manager for specific details about this opportunities.
License and Certification Requirements: 
Coding Certification Required: 
Optional
Coding License Required: 
Yes
Certification(s) Required: 
No
Major Optional Certifications: 
http://www.nh.gov/pharmacy/laws/tech_rules.htm
License Required: 
Yes
Career Categories: 

Types of Work:

Workplace Environment: 
Private Medical Practice or Private Company
Types of Interaction: 
Support Role