EMT/Paramedic

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Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics care for the sick or injured in emergency medical settings. People’s lives often depend on their quick reaction and competent care. EMTs and paramedics respond to emergency calls, performing medical services and transporting patients to medical facilities.A 911 operator sends EMTs and paramedics to the scene of an emergency, where they often work with police and firefighters.

EMTs and paramedics typically do the following:

  • Respond to 911 calls for emergency medical assistance, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or bandaging a wound
  • Assess a patient’s condition and determine a course of treatment
  • Follow guidelines that they learned in training and that they receive from physicians who oversee their work
  • Use backboards and restraints to keep patients still and safe in an ambulance for transport
  • Help transfer patients to the emergency department of a healthcare facility and report their observations and treatment to the staff
  • Create a patient care report; documenting the medical care they gave the patient
  • Replace used supplies and check or clean equipment after use

When taking a patient to the hospital, one EMT or paramedic may drive the ambulance while another monitors the patient’s vital signs and gives additional care. Some paramedics work as part of a helicopter’s flight crew to transport critically ill or injured patients to a hospital.

EMTs and paramedics also take patients from one medical facility to another. Some patients may need to be transferred to a hospital that specializes in treating their injury or illness or to a facility that provides long-term care, such as a nursing home.

If a patient has a contagious disease, EMTs and paramedics decontaminate the interior of the ambulance and may need to report these cases to the proper authorities.

The specific responsibilities of EMTs and paramedics depend on their level of training and the state they work in. The National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) provides national certification of EMTs and paramedics at four levels: EMT-Basic, EMT-Intermediate (which has two levels, respectively called 1985 and 1999), and Paramedic. Some states, however, have their own certification programs and use different titles.

Career Outlook: 
Career Outlook data is specific to New Hampshire State.
Number of Jobs 2010: 
1,340
Number of Projected Jobs 2020: 
1,696
Jobs Percentage Change: 
26.6%
Total Annual Openings: 
63
Growth Outlook: 
Very Favorable
June 2013 Entry Level Wage: 
$10.89
June 2013 Mean Wage: 
$16.45
June 2013 Experienced Wage: 
$19.23
Salary Range: 
$20,000 - $40,000
Education Requirements: 
Programs: 

Education Levels:

Education Levels:

Education Levels:

This job requires a minimum of a GED or a High School Diploma and on-the-job training. Please consult your Case Manager for specific details about this opportunities.
License and Certification Requirements: 
Coding Certification Required: 
No
Coding License Required: 
Yes
License Required: 
Yes
License Requirements: 
To be licensed you must be at least 18 years of age or older, complete a training program, and pass the New Hampshire EMS practical examination and National Registry computer-based testing.
Career Categories: 

Types of Work:

Workplace Environment: 
Community-Based Setting or Patients' Homes
Hospital
Types of Interaction: 
Direct Patient Interaction
Integrated Team Member